Overview of FFCRA-Related Tax Credits

April 01, 2020
Publication
Inside HR
FMLA
Wage & Hour
Paid Sick Leave
Read time: 3 mins

The FFCRA requires employers to provide paid leave through two separate provisions: (i) the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA), which entitles workers to up to 80 hours of paid sick time when they are unable to work for certain reasons related to COVID-19, and (ii) the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (Expanded FMLA), which entitles workers to certain paid family and medical leave. 

The FFCRA provides that employers subject to the EPSLA and the Expanded FMLA paid leave requirements are entitled to fully refundable tax credits to cover the cost of the leave required to be paid for these periods of time during which employees are unable to work (which for purposes of these rules, includes telework). Certain self-employed persons in similar circumstances are entitled to similar credits.

The IRS released guidance that provides an overview of FFCRA’s refundable tax credit provisions, and FAQs that provide more detailed information regarding the requirements, limitations, and application of the paid leave credits. Those FAQs can be found here.

How the Tax Credits Work

Eligible employers are entitled to refundable tax credits for qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages (collectively “qualified leave wages”), under sections 7001 and 7003 of the FFCRA respectively. These tax credits are increased by the qualified health plan expenses allocable to, and the eligible employer’s share of Medicare tax on, the qualified leave wages. The eligible employer is not subject to the employer portion of social security tax imposed on those wages.

The refundable tax credits apply to qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages paid for certain periods when an employee is unable to work, as described below, during the period beginning April 1, 2020, and ending December 31, 2020.

Eligible employers that pay qualified leave wages will be able to retain an amount of all federal employment taxes equal to the amount of the qualified leave wages paid, plus the allocable qualified health plan expenses and the amount of the employer’s share of Medicare tax imposed on those wages, rather than depositing them with the IRS. The federal employment taxes that are available for retention by eligible employers include federal income taxes withheld from employees, the employees’ share of social security and Medicare taxes, and the employer’s share of social security and Medicare taxes with respect to all employees.

If the federal employment taxes yet to be deposited are not sufficient to cover the eligible employer’s cost of qualified leave wages, plus the allocable qualified health plan expenses and the amount of the employer’s share of Medicare tax imposed on those wages, the employer will be able to file a request for an advance payment from the IRS. The IRS expects to begin processing these requests sometime in April 2020.

Required Documentation and Retention

Eligible employers claiming the credits for qualified leave wages, plus allocable qualified health plan expenses and the eligible employer’s share of Medicare taxes, must retain records and documentation related to and supporting each employee’s leave to substantiate the claim for the credits, as well retaining the Forms 941, Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, and 7200, Advance of Employer Credits Due To COVID-19, and any other applicable filings made to the IRS requesting the credit.

An eligible employer should keep all records of employment taxes for at least four years after the date the tax becomes due or is paid, whichever comes later. 

More detail on the refundable tax credits and the procedures to receive payment of the advance credit, along with a comprehensive FAQ, can be found here.

Source: IRS.gov